Construction of the Monument to Animals We Do Not Mourn has been greatly facilitated through the support of the Culture & Animals Foundation, Hartsdale Pet Cemetery, BronzArt Foundry, and many individual contributors who believe in the importance of recognizing unmourned animals and improving their welfare. From the initial pencil sketches to the casting of the bronze skull, building the monument has been an immensely gratifying process. This gallery showcases photographs of the construction of the monument at various stages. 
To Animals We Do Not Mourn
To Animals We Do Not Mourn

Cattle in field, New Mexico. Photo by Linda Brant

Culture & Animals Foundation
Culture & Animals Foundation

I am grateful to the Culture & Animals Foundation for awarding two creativity grants in support of this project.

Hartsdale Pet Cemetery, New York
Hartsdale Pet Cemetery, New York

Hartsdale Pet Cemetery in New York has been tremendously supportive of this project from its inception. Hartsdale will be home to the future Monument to Animals We Do Not Mourn.

BronzArt Foundry, Sarasota, FL
BronzArt Foundry, Sarasota, FL

The skillful staff and artisans at BronzArt Foundry did a tremendous job casting the bronze skull and fitting the quartz crystal just perfectly. It took many hours of dedicated work to create the custom skull - which will be the focal point of the monument.

May 18, 2019 Unveiling of the monument at Hartsdale Pet Cemetery. Pictured (left to right) are Mia MacDonald (Culture and Animals Foundation), Linda Brant (Artist) and Ed Martin (Hartsdale Pet Cemetery)

Plaque installed in front of the Monument to Animals We Do Not Mourn

Linda Brant and Ed Martin, III
Linda Brant and Ed Martin, III

In June, 2015, I visited Hartsdale Pet Cemetery for the first time. Ed Martin, III graciously gave me a tour of the cemetery and we discussed possible sites for the monument. We eventually decided on a location near Hartsdale's famous War Dog Memorial. In this photograph, we are standing in front of the future site of the monument.

This photo of the monument site was taken in 2015, before the monument was installed. Note the War Dog Memorial to the right.

The monument at Hartsdale Pet Cemetery in New York.

concept sketch
concept sketch

Final sketch of the monument

Original skull, clayed in
Original skull, clayed in

The first step was to acquire an actual cattle skull and 'clay in' the open spaces so that a wax copy could be made. I selected a juvenile skull because of its smaller size and the cracks that were created throughout its skull when the animal was slaughtered. This juvenile was reportedly slaughtered due to suspected disease.

Rough quartz crystal
Rough quartz crystal

The next step was to select a quartz crystal and find an expert gem-cutter to facet it. Shown here is the quartz crystal 'in the rough.'

Doug Augspurger, gem cutter
Doug Augspurger, gem cutter

Doug Augspurger did a fantastic job faceting the quartz crystal.

Faceted quartz crystal
Faceted quartz crystal

Shown here is the faceted crystal. It is complex, irregular and absolutely stunning.

Workshop
Workshop

A photograph taken in Doug Augspurger's workshop.

Wax of skull
Wax of skull

Lost wax casting is a lengthy process with many steps. Before the bronze casting can be done, a wax replica of the skull had to be produced. This is a photo of the skull in wax.

Wax of skull
Wax of skull

The wax skull is pictured in the foreground with the original skull in the background.

Designing placement of crystal
Designing placement of crystal

Steve at BronzArt Foundry, sketching a design for placing the crystal into the skull

Placing the crystal
Placing the crystal

A space was cut into the wax to fit the crystal. Once the skull is in bronze, the crystal will be inserted through the back of the skull and secured with two screws.

Placing the crystal
Placing the crystal

The crystal was temporarily placed in the wax so that the spacing could be precisely determined. Before the bronze casting, the crystal was gently removed from the wax.

Designing
Designing

More planning and sketching with the assistance of Kendall, Wes, and Steve at BronzArt Foundry in Sarasota.

Designing
Designing

More planning and sketching with the assistance of Kendall, Wes, and Steve at BronzArt Foundry in Sarasota.

Designing
Designing

More planning and sketching with the assistance of Kendall, Wes, and Steve at BronzArt Foundry in Sarasota.

Bronze
Bronze

The lost wax casting process was used to cast the bronze and the crystal was inserted into the space. Thankfully, it fit perfectly! Kendall figued out a way to secure the crystal.

Mounting options
Mounting options

A design showing how the skull will be attached to the granite tablet.

Bronze
Bronze

This is a photo of the back side of the skull, showing how the crystal will be secured.

Bronze
Bronze

The skull in bronze with the crystal- before the patina is applied.

Bronze
Bronze

Detail view of the skull in bronze with the crystal- before the patina is applied.

Bronze
Bronze

A side view of the skull before patina is applied

Patina in progress
Patina in progress

We decided on a white patina, with just a few variations to add depth.

Patina in progress
Patina in progress

Wayne at BronzArt Foundry, applying the white patina to the bronze.

Patina
Patina

Wayne at BronzArt Foundry, applying the white patina to the bronze.

Linda Brant holding the bronze cattle skull before shipping it to the granite company in Vermont.

Final skull
Final skull

The skull in its final form, before mounting to the granite.

The monument in production at Adams Granite Company in Vermont

The monument in production at Adams Granite Company in Vermont

Front view of the monument at Hartsdale Pet Cemetery in New York.

Detail of skull, Monument to Animals We Do Not Mourn

Detail of skull, Monument to Animals We Do Not Mourn

View of the monument at Hartsdale Pet Cemetery in New York, during the unveiling on 5/18/19